Minimal access surgery training in South Africa – changing philosophy and enabling the future

Abstract

In this issue two articles highlight the experience with inguinal hernia repair in public facilities affiliated to tertiary university centres in a South African1,2. In the first paper the authors highlight their single centre experience with inguinal hernia repair over a 5-year period and in the other the authors recount their 1-year multicentre experience with inguinal hernia repair. Interestingly, the number of inguinal hernia repairs performed minimally invasively in both series was relatively low. In the first paper, there was more involvement of trainees in the performance of both laparoscopic and open inguinal hernia repair, while 1 in the second  study, only 15% of the hernias were repaired laparoscopically and 75% were underwent open repair. There was less involvement of trainees as first surgeons in the procedures. Both articles reflect a relatively low utilization of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in public training facilities in South African. The experience in the private sector as recounted by McGuire et al 3 also describes an equally low uptake in the private sector.

Author Biography

Z M Koto, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University

Department of Surgery, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, South Africa

Published
2020-12-08
How to Cite
Koto, Z. (2020). Minimal access surgery training in South Africa – changing philosophy and enabling the future. South African Journal of Surgery, 58(4), 174-175. Retrieved from http://sajs.redbricklibrary.com/index.php/sajs/article/view/3533
Section
Editorial