The tangible consequences and intangible implications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy-associated bile duct injuries

Keywords: quality of life, bile duct injury, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, litigation, cost, laparoscopic cholecystectomy-associated bile duct injuries

Abstract

When laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) was introduced more than two decades ago, alarming rates of bile duct injuries (BDIs) occurred in up to 0.4% of operations, twice as often as with open cholecystectomy, with only a recent decrease in incidence.1 Three contemporary studies from the National Health Service database in the UK and two statewide databases in the USA (New York and California), report laparoscopic cholecystectomy bile duct injury (LC-BDI) rates between 0.08–0.22%, which are comparable to open cholecystectomy, but these estimations may not accurately represent the true incidence of BDIs elsewhere.2-4

Author Biographies

J Lindemann, University of Cape Town

Surgical Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Health Sciences, Groote Schuur Hospital, University of Cape Town, South Africa and Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, United States of America

J E J Krige, University of Cape Town

Surgical Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Health Sciences, Groote Schuur Hospital, University of Cape Town, South Africa

E Jonas, University of Cape Town

Surgical Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Health Sciences, Groote Schuur Hospital, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Published
2020-01-14
How to Cite
Lindemann, J., Krige, J., & Jonas, E. (2020). The tangible consequences and intangible implications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy-associated bile duct injuries. South African Journal of Surgery, 58(01), 4-6. Retrieved from http://sajs.redbricklibrary.com/index.php/sajs/article/view/3185
Section
Perspective