“A tale of two cities”: A snapshot survey of neurosurgical procedures performed in public and private sectors in eThekwini

Keywords: Neurosurgery, Public Health Medicine, Health Disparities

Abstract

Access to neurosurgical care in South Africa is influenced by prevailing inequities in healthcare. It is generally perceived that the public sector performs mainly emergencies relating to trauma, and the private sector performs mainly elective spinal surgery. In March 2015, emergencies constituted 51% of cases in the public sector compared to 8% in the private sector. Trauma, paediatric hydrocephalus and intracranial sepsis constituted nearly 75% of the operative workload in the public sector. Cranial surgery accounted for the majority (95%) of operations in the public sector, whereas the majority in the private sector was spinal (75%). There is considerable disparity in the type of neurosurgery being performed in the public and private sectors in KwaZulu-Natal and with the current financial constraints, there is a potential unmet need for elective spinal surgery in the public sector.

Author Biographies

Rohen Harrichandparsad, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Department of Neurosurgery, Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital, Durban, South Africa and Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Sameer S Nadvi, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Private Practice, St. Augustine’s Hospital, Durban and Department of Neurosurgery, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Avashri Naidoo, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Discipline of Public Health Medicine, School of Nursing and Public Health, University of KwaZulu-Natal,
Durban, South Africa

Ozayr Mahomed, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Discipline of Public Health Medicine, School of Nursing and Public Health, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa

Published
2019-05-14
How to Cite
Harrichandparsad, R., Nadvi, S., Naidoo, A., & Mahomed, O. (2019). “A tale of two cities”: A snapshot survey of neurosurgical procedures performed in public and private sectors in eThekwini. South African Journal of Surgery, 57(2), 61. Retrieved from http://sajs.redbricklibrary.com/index.php/sajs/article/view/2732
Section
Neurosurgery